C'est la vie

nybg:

What’s beautiful now? Kiku! What’s kiku you ask? It is the Japanese word for chrysanthemum, but it is also the name of a horticultural artform similar to bonsai, kind of. Where bonsai is small, kiku is large. Where bonsai is minimalist, kiku is maximalist. Each floral sculpture starts as one wee stem that is then pruned and prodded to take on complex forms over 11 months. And then they go on display for less than a month during Kiku: The Art of the Japanese Garden in the Enid A. Haupt Conservatory. And then we start all over again. Kiku opens Saturday and runs through October 27.

For day-to-day updates on what we’re seeing around grounds, be sure to follow us on Instagram and Twitter where we post daily updates from our staff and visitors. Need help getting around? Our iPhone app can help out there. It’s free and available in the App Store.

Photos by NYBG photographer Ivo M. Vermeulen.

nybg:

nicolekirstiesmith:

Summer at the New York Botanical Garden

I spent a couple of restorative hours wandering around the NYBG yesterday enjoying the tranquility and calm that the space and greenery provide.

I love the plantings along the Seasonal Walk and the Perennial and Herb gardens outside the Conservatory. Whoever designs these plantings has a wonderful eye for colour and texture.

However, it was terribly humid, so an idea for a new permanent exhibition sprung into my mind: plants of the sub-Antarctic and sub-Arctic and at the end of the exhibit, an ice bar selling vodka & frozen cocktails. I know I’m biased, but I think this would be a real crowd-pleaser.

Seconding the motion. And in a perfect world, I’d bang a gavel and shout “MOTION PASSED.” An ice bar would miraculously appear, surrounded by frost-rimed trees and shrubs in an exhibition equal parts remote Taiga wilderness and deep Patagonian coastline. It would be good. —MN

nybg:

theatlantic:

Who’s Afraid of a Cluster of Holes? 16 Percent of People

Trypophobia is the fear of clustered holes like those shown in the lotus seed pod above. The lotus seed is the classic example of the sort of holes that frighten trypophobics, but sponges, soap bubbles and even aerated chocolate can be triggers. Trypophobia is not recognized in pyschiatry’s Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, but it is present in 16 percent of people, according to a new study in Psychological Science, which is the first to address the strange fear.
“The stimuli are usually clusters of holes of any variety that are almost always innocuous and seemingly pose no threat,” the authors note. But they induce visceral reactions all the same.
“[I] can’t really face small, irregularly or asymmetrically placed holes, they make me like, throw up in my mouth, cry a little bit, and shake all over, deeply,” one trypophobe involved in the study said. My apparently trypophobic friend Monica says of the lotus seed pod: “That photo actually makes me want to stab my eyes out.”
Read more. [Image: Stephen Wheeler/flickr]


If a phobia can be “popular,” this one is topping the charts in the public consciousness lately. People have even taken to Photoshopping hole-y horror shows to troll their friends on Facebook. (Sorry if the lotus set you off!) In any case, if your trypophobia is severe, I suggest taking an active role in avoiding our Conservatory Pools during summer. It’ll do you good. —MN

nybg:

theatlantic:

Who’s Afraid of a Cluster of Holes? 16 Percent of People

Trypophobia is the fear of clustered holes like those shown in the lotus seed pod above. The lotus seed is the classic example of the sort of holes that frighten trypophobics, but sponges, soap bubbles and even aerated chocolate can be triggers. Trypophobia is not recognized in pyschiatry’s Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, but it is present in 16 percent of people, according to a new study in Psychological Science, which is the first to address the strange fear.

“The stimuli are usually clusters of holes of any variety that are almost always innocuous and seemingly pose no threat,” the authors note. But they induce visceral reactions all the same.

“[I] can’t really face small, irregularly or asymmetrically placed holes, they make me like, throw up in my mouth, cry a little bit, and shake all over, deeply,” one trypophobe involved in the study said. My apparently trypophobic friend Monica says of the lotus seed pod: “That photo actually makes me want to stab my eyes out.”

Read more. [Image: Stephen Wheeler/flickr]

If a phobia can be “popular,” this one is topping the charts in the public consciousness lately. People have even taken to Photoshopping hole-y horror shows to troll their friends on Facebook. (Sorry if the lotus set you off!) In any case, if your trypophobia is severe, I suggest taking an active role in avoiding our Conservatory Pools during summer. It’ll do you good. —MN

nybg:

What’s Beautiful Now?

I’m throwing my votes behind late summer produce. Each Wednesday, around 9 a.m., I walk in through the Mosholu Gate with a straggling crew of coffee-toting colleagues. The Greenmarket farm vendors are already set up by that time, wide awake with their latest picks arranged for incoming customers, so some of us will branch off to pass by the tables before making our way into the office. The morning light on the peppers and peaches is almost always picturesque. —MN

nybg:

What’s beautiful now? If you ask our horticulturists they’ll say one thing: rain. It’s been a pretty dry spring, and while we have the ability to water deeply, there’s just nothing a plant loves more than an old fashioned rain storm. And like the adage says: May showers bring May flowers …. er, or something.

Just in time for Mother’s Day, we’re seeing a real turn towards the later spring flowers now, away from the cherry blossoms and daffodils of early spring. This week is all about flowering shrubs like lilacs, azaleas, and tree peonies. And then there are the tulips. Oh sooooo many tulips! In an absolute riot of color all over the Home Gardening Center.

In the newly opened Native Plant Garden things are a little more subdued, but still so lovely. Expect lots of beautiful dogwoods and gorgeous drifts of foam flower, Tiarella cordifolia. In the Ruth Rea Howell Family Garden, the Otto Pizza Garden beds, part of Mario Batali’s Kitchen Gardens are looking unmistakably pizza-like.

What’s still beautiful from last week? The Peggy Rockefeller Rose Garden has another bloom every day. On Tuesday it was Rosa nutkana. By this weekend there should be a handful more in bloom. The Azalea Garden just gets better with each passing day, and the Native Plant Garden is just awesome, the perfect place to celebrate your mom on Sunday.

So, ready to come hang out with us in the Bronx? Here’s everything you need to know. For day-to-day updates on what we’re seeing around grounds, be sure to follow us on Instagram and Twitter where we post daily updates from our staff and visitors. Also, need help getting around? Our iPhone app can help out there. It’s free and available in the App Store. ~AR

nybg:

The herbaceous peonies are back! ‘Starlight,’ ‘Seraphim, and ‘Athena.’ (at New York Botanical Garden)

nybg:

The herbaceous peonies are back! ‘Starlight,’ ‘Seraphim, and ‘Athena.’ (at New York Botanical Garden)

nybg:

It’s time for tulips to take a stand! What’s beautiful now? Oh boy, are you tired of hearing everything yet? Yeah, I thought so, so let’s be specific. The Perennial Garden has once again become the lunchtime lounging spot for me and my colleagues (that is if there’s a spare bench, you guys always get first dibs!).

While you’re in the Perennial Garden, you will likely be stopped dead in your tracks by an absolutely stunning bush sporting pompoms of nearly neon red flowers. That would be Rhododendron ‘Taurus’ which was described to me yesterday by our Manager of Plant Records Jon Peter as a “totally incredible plant!!!!” (not lying about the number of exclamation points there, that’s how awesome ‘Taurus’ is).

Along Seasonal Walk you’ll see tulips, tulips, and more tulips. While on Daffodil Hill you’ll see daffodils, daffodils, and more daffodils. Cherry Valley is home to, you guessed it, cherries, cherries and more cherries, while the Azalea Garden is featuring … meh, a few azaleas. Let’s just say it’s not her time yet.

If lilacs are your thing, they’re coming soon. If I could liken our lilac collection to a bag of microwave popcorn I would say we’ve probably heard about one or two pops. Not sure when the volley of fireworks will come, but probably next week, but with this cool weather, who can really tell?

And speaking of cool weather, you can still see lots of the beauties I was talking about last week and the week before, but most of the blooms of three-weeks ago have finally given up the ghost (sadface for the magnolias). Ready to plan your journey to the Bronx? Here’s everything you need to know.

For day-to-day updates on what we’re seeing around grounds, be sure to follow us on Instagram and Twitter where we post daily updates from our staff and visitors. Also, need help getting around? Our iPhone app can help out there. It’s free and available in the App Store. ~AR

nybg:

themoosehead:

If you haven’t had a chance to visit New York Botanical Garden’s Orchid Show, it’s worth it and you have about two-and-half-hours to see it before it ends today. Minus the one hour it takes to get there.

I’m so sorry.

Anyway, old men taking photos of flowers.

And thus a new photo genre is born!

Oh, and sorry, but The Orchid Show is now closed for 2013. Good thing there’s still plenty of flowers to come take pictures of people taking pictures of! ~AR

3rdsword:

A stroll through the garden #orchidshow with @gregcavo

3rdsword:

A stroll through the garden #orchidshow with @gregcavo

nybg:

tinktastichana:

For me, every hour is grace. And I feel gratitude in my heart each time I can meet someone and look at his or her smile.

- Elie Wiesel

On the first day of official spring day, I found these beautiful spring blossoms at The New York Botanical Garden. Chilly breeze & warm sunshine…they smiled and gave me a hope for a new season, a new beginning. I also found Paper Bush & Viburnum blooming :)))))))) Well, I did my happy dance underneath the blossoms… oh, and Chickadees say hello to everyone ;p Chirrrrrp!

Have a happy spring season!


Much love,

Hana

This is just lovely! Thanks for celebrating the Vernal Equinox with us! ~AR